Brewster House Bed & Breakfast (Freeport, Maine Coast)

Category Archives: lighthouse map

Visiting Maine Lighthouses – Cape Neddick (The Nubble)

May 7, 2013 by Scott Gile

Cape Neddick Lighthouse (the "Nubble")

Not too surprisingly, Cape Neddick Lighthouse (nicknamed the “Nubble” or Nubble Light) is one of the most often photographed of Maine’s 60-plus lighthouses. That is because it is so accessible (see our Maine Lighthouse Map).

In the town of York Beach, less than half an hour from the New Hampshire border, the lighthouse stands on a small island known as the Nubble, less than 100 yards off shore.

Cape Neddick lighthouse is charming in its gingerbread Victorian keepers house, perched on the small island. It is decorated in white lights every year at Christmas time, and these photos abound on the internet.

Since many are not able (or willing) to visit Maine in December, the lighthouse is also lighted for the town of York’s “Christmas in July” – which falls this year on July 28. If you’d like to see it decorated, but don’t want to brave the New England winter, you may like to visit for Christmas in July.

Nubble Lighthouse is one of several lighthouses on our Lighthouse Tour special at Brewster House, as guests can easily visit it from our Freeport Maine Bed & Breakfast.

Ruth & Scott
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine

Things to do near Freeport: Lighthouses and Lobster Shacks

August 7, 2012 by Scott Gile

Lighthouses and Lobster Shacks – they make a great combination. When sightseeing from a base in Freeport, you can find plenty of Maine lighthouses and lobster shacks, but, even better, you can often find both of them together.

For example, let’s say you are staying at our Freeport Maine bed and breakfast, and you’d like to visit some lighthouses, but would also like to see some lobster shacks and enjoy a wonderful lobster dinner (or two).

After breakfast you might head south to Cape Elizabeth, where you can spend hours at Fort Williams Park, enjoying Portland Head Lighthouse and the museum in its keepers’ house, as well as the old stone house, the two forts (from different eras), the beach, playground, and hiking trails along the bluffs. When you are ready to leave the park, you simply turn left, and enjoy the drive along the water back to Route 77, then proceed to Two Lights, where you can enjoy the double lighthouse, plus Two Lights Lobster Shack, and the wonderful views from it’s perch on a hill. You can walk out the rocks above the water, and even see Portland Head Lighthouse in the distance, on a clear day.

After enjoying a break at Two Lights Lobster Shack, you might return north, taking I-295 to US-1 in Brunswick, then enjoy the drive to Damariscotta, then take Route 130 out the peninsula to Pemaquid Point Lighthouse, where you can admire the spectacular views. Afterward, you can return only as far as Route 32, where you’ll find New Harbor, and Shaws Lobster.

As an alternative, you might visit Five Islands Lobster Company, on Georgetown Island. From that lovely location you can watch the lobster boats return with their catch, and enjoy it on the picnic tables on the dock, while gazing across the mouth of the Sheepscot River at Hendricks Head Lighthouse.

Another option, if you go south of Portland, is to find your way to the hidden gem or the area, Cape Porpoise, where you’ll find Pier 77 Restaurant and Grille – not exactly a lobster shack, but a great place for a nice meal (lobster or otherwise), and just offshore is Goat Island Lighthouse.

Still farther south is Cape Neddick Lighthouse (“the Nubble”), and Fox’s Lobster. Cape Neddick is one of Maine’s most photographed lighthouses, and provides a great backdrop while you enjoy your feast!

Ruth & Scott
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine

Touring Maine Lighthouses (with Lighthouse Map)

April 24, 2012 by Scott Gile

One of the most common things visitors to Freeport Maine want to do, it seems, is to visit our Maine lighthouses. We love lighthouses, so we completely understand. Nevertheless, there are over 60 of them in Maine (and some are miles out to sea), so seeing more than a few can be quite a challenge. However, our lighthouse map will help you find a way to include most Maine lighthouses on your tour.

If you click on the lighthouse icons, you can get driving directions to any of the lighthouse from the Google map below.

 
View Maine Lighthouses – Brewster House Bed & Breakfast in a larger map

We find the most effective way to make use of your time is to establish a base of operations in an area that is centrally located to several lighthouses. That way you can visit several lighthouses without having to move yourself from place to place too often.

For example, if you stay in Freeport, you can visit several lighthouses within an hour or so drive either to the north or south. A two- to four-night stay in Freeport will give you the opportunity to visit up to 13 lighthouses (and see at least three more offshore). Some of these lighthouses are in extremely picturesque locations – by their very nature, they are on high points overlooking the ocean, so these places are all great fun to visit, and to take photographs, in their own right.

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse

A hop up the coast to visit our friends in Camden, at the Inns at Blackberry Common, will give you an opportunity to see several more lighthouses in the mid-coast region (though some, like Curtis Island Lighthouse, can only be seen by air or from the water). While you’re in that area, don’t forget to stop at the Lighthouse Museum in Rockland.

If you stay on, or near, Mount Desert Island (whether in Bar Harbor, or one of the other lovely villages nearby), there are wonderful lighthouse on the island, or farther north, even up to Lubec, on the Canadian border.

Of course, as we’ve noted previously, you can actually make a visit to Lubec, and West Quoddy Head Lighthouse (the easternmost point in the United States) a day trip from Freeport, though it is a long day – about four hours each way.

If you are interested in lighthouses, Maine is the place to visit, as there are so many lighthouses, and they are remarkably accessible.

Scott & Ruth
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine

Maine Lighthouses Near Freeport

February 28, 2012 by Scott Gile

You may also want to view our newer article, Touring Maine Lighthouses (with Lighthouse Map).

“Where is the nearest lighthouse?” “How long will it take to visit a lighthouse?” “Can we go up in a lighthouse?”

These and other questions are routinely asked by guests at Brewster House Bed & Breakfast in Freeport. A couple of years ago we wrote an article introducing some of our favorite lighthouses, and our Maine lighthouse map.

 

As you can see from the small version of the Maine lighthouse map, above, there are actually a number of lighthouses not far from our Freeport Maine bed and breakfast. The nearest ones you can see are off the coast just a little north on US-1, and can be seen from Harpswell Neck or from Bailey Island’s extreme end (called Land’s End), but neither is accessible without a boat. A bit farther up US-1, turning toward the coast from Bath, Maine, there are several small lighthouses along the Kennebec River, and can be seen from either side (from the road to Phippsburg, Maine, or from Georgetown Island), and then there are more lighthouses on islands offshore.

Similar to the smaller lighthouses elsewhere, Portland Harbor has two small lighthouses that can be visited, but the lighthouse most want to see in the Portland area is Portland Head Lighthouse. Commissioned by President George Washington, the lighthouse is the oldest in America, and is beautifully restored. The museum in the keeper’s house is very interesting, and provides wonderful insights into the life of the keeper, and area history. The park is a great place for a picnic, or to just while away the afternoon, watching kites overhead and sailboats on Casco Bay. You can only go up the tower at Portland Head on Maine Open Lighthouse Day, each year in September.

The nearest lighthouse where you can climb the tower is Pemaquid Point, near Bristol, Maine. It is about an hour from Brewster House, and is open whenever there is a volunteer available to assist you, seasonally. This lighthouse stands at the top of a rocky bluff, with ocean waves crashing on the rocks below, making a dramatic place to enjoy the lighthouse and the natural beauty of the area. As the map above indicates, there are many other lighthouses to explore, and quite a few of them are not far from our bed & breakfast. In fact, our Lighthouse Tour special will help you find your way to several of them!

Ruth & Scott
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast

Where Do All the Guests Go After Breakfast?

July 21, 2011 by Scott Gile

Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine

Most people who visit our Freeport Maine Bed & Breakfast arrive planning to spend a bit of time shopping at the Freeport outlets and shops, or sightseeing along the Maine coast. However, as happens a few times each year, the other morning found a couple at breakfast who had no idea there was shopping in Freeport, had never heard of L.L. Bean, and didn’t know where all the other guests were going after breakfast!

Where are all the guests going?

Shopping

About 2 out of every 5 guests walking from Brewster House to the Freeport shops and outlets, which begin just about a block from our door. FreeportUSA says there are over 200 shops and restaurants in Freeport, but that number belies the charm of the historic buildings along Main Street.

In addition to L.L. Bean’s campus, which includes four of its stores (all four of these are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week), most of the shops and restaurants are located in historic buildings, dating to the late 1800’s. Even the McDonalds in Freeport is in a house that dates back before 1870. In the midst of all this is Freeport Village Station, which is a modern collection of shops and eateries, built to blend in with the historic buildings around it, and which included the L.L. Bean Outlet, which is the only L.L. Bean store that closes.

Sightseeing

Most of the rest of our guests leave quickly after breakfast to cover as much ground as possible, as they have planned sightseeing trips for the day that will take them to as many as eight lighthouses, at least three beaches, hiking in one of at least five state parks, or even all the way to Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park (now that is really a full day of sightseeing!). Our lighthouse map can help you find your way to the Maine lighthouses.

Lobster

Red’s Eats, Wiscasset

Some of our guests just can’t get enough lobster while they’re in Maine (imagine that)!

In addition to Freeport’s own lobster shack on the South Freeport dock, Harraseeket Lunch & Lobster, they will drive south to Kennebunkport to try the Clam Shack (reknowned for its lobster rolls), or north to Wiscasset to sample the rolls at Red’s Eats. Still others will visit Five Islands Lobster Shack, or head for Pemaquid Point Lighthouse, followed by a side trip to Shaws Lobster in New Harbor, or Cape Elizabeth Lighthouse and Two Lights Lobster Shack. Of course, we have a map of Maine lobster shacks, too.

Whatever your interest (and tastes), nearly all our first-time visitors (and more than a few of our returning guests) find that there is more to do than they can possibly fit into just a couple of days. They leave anxious to plan their next visit to Freeport, Maine!

Maine Lighthouse Tour (Part 2)

June 21, 2011 by Scott Gile

Last week we presented Part 1 of our Lighthouse Tour, heading south from Brewster House B&B in Freeport, Maine, and visiting Portland Head Lighthouse and Cape Elizabeth Light (Two Lights), as well as Cape Neddick Light (The Nubble).

This time we’ll turn to the north and take US-1 an hour or so north to Rockland, where you can optionally visit the Maine Lighthouse Museum. You can also go just a bit farther on US-1, to Camden, to enjoy the beautiful harbor town.

Owls Head Lighthouse

From Rockland, we’ll turn south, toward Owls Head, and visit Owls Head Lighthouse. The lighthouse, standing atop a small hill, but steep enough to require stairs to the top, overlooks Rockland Harbor and Penobscot Bay, providing magnificent views. The lighthouse was lighted in 1825 to help guide mariners safely into Rockland Harbor.

Leaving Owls Head, you may want to stop for a tour of the wonderful Owls Head Transportation Museum, with its antique automobiles, as well as old aeroplanes (all still in working order!) and more. Driving down the peninsula past Spruce Harbor and St. George, there are other lighthouses we can not see – Two Bush Island Light, Tenants Harbor Light, and Whitehead Light – all of which can only be seen from the water (or by air). Next we turn toward Port Clyde and Marshall Point Lighthouse. Be sure to visit the Port Clyde General Store, and view the harbor from their picnic tables (perhaps while eating lunch).

Marshall Point Lighthouse

Marshall Point Lighthouse, marking the entrance to Port Clyde Harbor, was first built in 1832, then rebuilt as it currently stands in 1857. The beautiful setting is popular with photographers, who gather at the site early, awaiting a spectacular sunset opportunity.

Returning to the north, we come to Thomaston, a lovely town with restored Victorian homes, shady trees, and a quaint downtown. Proceeding south on US-1, you’ll pass Moody’s Diner, where you can get almost anything, from a grilled cheese sandwich to a lobster dinner, and their blueberry pie (or ‘most any other you like) is always worth stopping for!

Pemaquid Point Light

At Damariscotta we’ll turn off US-1, pass through the pretty village, and follow Route 130 to the end, where we’ll visit Pemaquid Point Lighthouse. First built and lighted in 1827, the structure wasn’t sound, and was replaced in 1835. There is a magnificent view from the bluff where the lighthouse stands, and you can easily walk down the rocks to view the lighthouse from below. When volunteers are present you can go up in the tower, and there is a museum in the Keeper’s house.

The Cuckholds Light

Returning to Damariscotta and US-1, we can take the turnoff for Route 27 toward Boothbay Harbor, then turn toward West Boothbay and Newagen, where, near the end of Southport Island, we can see The Cuckolds Light. This lighthouse is not well known, and dates from 1892, when it was erected to prevent vessels from running aground on the ledges nearby.

We’ll return after a visit to Boothbay Harbor (and maybe an ice cream cone), taking US-1 south to Brewster House.

Get all the information on our Lighthouse Tour on our specials page.

Lighthouses in Maine: Tour (Part 1)

June 15, 2011 by Scott Gile

At our Freeport Maine Bed & Breakfast we’ve recently seen quite a few bookings for our specials and packages, especially our Maine Lighthouse Tour package. What is the attraction? Let’s see if we can find out.

First of all, there are over 60 lighthouses in Maine (check out our Maine Lighthouse Map for the locations), so seeing all of them in a day is somewhat challenging – especially when you consider that some are well off-shore! So we’ve made some hard choices, and come up with a tour that will take all day if you do it all, but will take you to seven lighthouses (and you’ll pass tantalizingly close to a few more), and some of the most beautiful and dramatic views along the Maine coast.

Portland Head Light

We begin by getting on Interstate 295 in Freeport, and heading south toward Portland. We’ll exit at Forest Avenue, wind through town a bit, cross the Casco Bay Bridge, and navigate through the beautiful and stately old homes of Cape Elizabeth, until we reach Fort Williams Park. Entering the park (Free Admission!!), we pass old barracks, a playground, the parade ground, and park near the gun battery. We can explore the grounds, including the old stone house, and another fort, or sit on a hill overlooking the lighthouse, watching kites and sailboats. Portland Head was originally commissioned in 1785 and first lighted in 1790. There is a nice museum in the keeper’s house.

Cape Elizabeth Light (Two Lights)



Turning left as we leave the park, we’ll make our way through Cape Elizabeth to the road which leads to Two Lights State Park, but rather than going into the park, we’ll pass it by and go to the end of the road, where we can see the twin lighthouses known as “Two Lights,” built in 1828. If there’s room, we’ll park in the dirt lot at the end of the road, then walk out the rocks to get a good look back at the towers, and, if the weather is clear, back down the coast to Portland Head Light. Climbing a small bluff, where Two Lights Lobster Shack is located, there is a great view of the lighthouses, and also out across the bay.

Cape Neddick Light (The Nubble)

We have a choice of returning to US-1 to continue south, or getting on Interstate 295/95, but in either case we’ll want to get back to US-1 at Biddeford, then take the drive from Kennebunk to Kennebunkport on Route 35. This pretty drive goes past some beautiful old homes with interesting histories. If you like, you can also take a small detour to Cape Porpoise, hidden away just above Kennebunkport, and home of Goat Island Light, just offshore.

Continuing back to US-1 from Kennebunkport, you pass through several interesting towns – Wells, Ogunquit, York and York Beach, before winding toward the sea and Cape Neddick Lighthouse, built in 1879 (which, interestingly enough, is located in York Beach, not the town of Cape Neddick). The lighthouse is located just offshore on a rocky island, hence the nickname “The Nubble.” The keeper used to cross via boat (and it could be waded at low tide, but that was treacherous, until a gondola and cable system was installed.

Cape Neddick Lighthouse is lighted in white lights at Christmas, but since many who visit there choose to come in warmer weather and would otherwise never see its decoration, it is lighted again for the month of July each year.

In our next installment, we’ll head north of Brewster House to see more lighthouses!

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