Brewster House Bed & Breakfast (Freeport, Maine Coast)

Category Archives: lobster shack map

If it’s Spring, Can Lobster be Far Away?

March 12, 2013 by Scott Gile

It’s March, and that means that Spring is almost here (and our Spring Serenity Special – 3 for 2 – IS here, but we digress!), and that means it won’t be long before Maine’s wonderful lobster shacks will begin to open their doors for the 2013 season!

Harraseeket Lunch & Lobster, Freeport, Maine

Most open in mid- to late-May, and remain open until mid- to late-October. Here in Freeport, our own Harraseeket Lunch & Lobster (pictured) opens May 1 and stays open until about mid-October each year.

Many of our guests make sure they stop at Harraseeket Lunch & Lobster at least once while they’re in town to enjoy the famous Freeport shopping. However, since most of our guests also visit many of the other coastal attractions, from beaches, state parks and lighthouses, to museums and botanical gardens, they like to know about the other lobster shacks throughout the areas where they are exploring.

For that purpose, we also created our Secret Lobster Shacks of Maine guide, with map and photos of some of our favorites. Wherever you are traveling in Maine, this guide will show you the nearest lobster shack!

It’s good eatin’!

Ruth & Scott
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine

Things to do near Freeport: Lighthouses and Lobster Shacks

August 7, 2012 by Scott Gile

Lighthouses and Lobster Shacks – they make a great combination. When sightseeing from a base in Freeport, you can find plenty of Maine lighthouses and lobster shacks, but, even better, you can often find both of them together.

For example, let’s say you are staying at our Freeport Maine bed and breakfast, and you’d like to visit some lighthouses, but would also like to see some lobster shacks and enjoy a wonderful lobster dinner (or two).

After breakfast you might head south to Cape Elizabeth, where you can spend hours at Fort Williams Park, enjoying Portland Head Lighthouse and the museum in its keepers’ house, as well as the old stone house, the two forts (from different eras), the beach, playground, and hiking trails along the bluffs. When you are ready to leave the park, you simply turn left, and enjoy the drive along the water back to Route 77, then proceed to Two Lights, where you can enjoy the double lighthouse, plus Two Lights Lobster Shack, and the wonderful views from it’s perch on a hill. You can walk out the rocks above the water, and even see Portland Head Lighthouse in the distance, on a clear day.

After enjoying a break at Two Lights Lobster Shack, you might return north, taking I-295 to US-1 in Brunswick, then enjoy the drive to Damariscotta, then take Route 130 out the peninsula to Pemaquid Point Lighthouse, where you can admire the spectacular views. Afterward, you can return only as far as Route 32, where you’ll find New Harbor, and Shaws Lobster.

As an alternative, you might visit Five Islands Lobster Company, on Georgetown Island. From that lovely location you can watch the lobster boats return with their catch, and enjoy it on the picnic tables on the dock, while gazing across the mouth of the Sheepscot River at Hendricks Head Lighthouse.

Another option, if you go south of Portland, is to find your way to the hidden gem or the area, Cape Porpoise, where you’ll find Pier 77 Restaurant and Grille – not exactly a lobster shack, but a great place for a nice meal (lobster or otherwise), and just offshore is Goat Island Lighthouse.

Still farther south is Cape Neddick Lighthouse (“the Nubble”), and Fox’s Lobster. Cape Neddick is one of Maine’s most photographed lighthouses, and provides a great backdrop while you enjoy your feast!

Ruth & Scott
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine

Secret Lobster Shacks of Maine (with Map to the Treasure!)

March 6, 2012 by Scott Gile

Tucked away in a hidden harbor, nestled between two buildings, at the end of a pier, Maine’s lobster shacks may be where you least expect them. Oh, sure, many visitors have heard of some of them – Red’s Eats, Barnacle Billy’s, The Clam Shack. But we think there are many, many more that far fewer have discovered. Some have been “exposed” by Travel + Leisure magazine’s 2009 article, “10 Best Lobster Shacks in Maine“, but many others are found only by a few who stumble across them, or are given directions and recommendations, by a sympathetic innkeeper or host.

Several years ago we created a map of Maine lobster shacks that remains one of our most popular links today. We’ll be using that map, expanded and updated with photos where possible (many are our own photos – where that wasn’t possible, we’ve included photos from the website of the lobster shack, if available, so apologies if any links end up broken due to moved photos).

The full map is below, and we’ll be journeying from south to north up the Maine coast, with 19 lobster shacks to visit.


View Favorite Lobster Shacks (and similar spots) in a larger map

1. Chauncey Creek Lobster Pier, Kittery Point


Chauncey Creek Lobster Pier

Just across the Piscataqua River bridge from Portsmouth, NH, at Kittery Point, Maine, is Chauncey Creek Lobster Pier. They’ve been boiling and serving for over 50 years, and are well known by visitors and locals alike..

2. Shore Road Lobster

Off a back road, along the coast, in York, is a little red country store that serves excellent, fresh, and inexpensive, lobster and lobster rolls. There are a few picnic tables outside, as well as a small dining area inside. They don’t have a website, but their reviews on TripAdvisor are glowing! We’ve tried it, and we loved it. Shore Road Lobster is only a short drive from Cape Neddick Lighthouse (the Nubble), so it made for a great afternoon for us!

3. Barnacle Billy’s, Perkins Cove


Barnacle Billy’s

Perkins Cove is, itself, a well-kept secret. A beautiful hidden cove, just down Shore Road from Ogunquit, appears almost magically, as you leave the world behind. Barnacle Billy’s is an institution for those who’ve tried it, and a secret well-concealed from those who haven’t. Enjoy a wonderful lobster dinner (or other great seafood meal) at the waters’ edge, and just across the way is Goat Island Lighthouse – another gem rarely seen by visitors.

4. The Clam Shack, Kennebunkport

In beautiful Kennebunkport, on the bridge over the Kennebunk River, the Clam Shack is considered (along with Red’s Eats) one of the best, if not the best, place for lobster rolls in the entire State of Maine. Eat outside and stroll along the bridge, enjoying the sights and sounds of the harbor and the town.


Nunan’s Lobster Hut

5. Nunan’s Lobster Hut, Kennebunkport

Like the Clam Shack, Nunan’s is a no-frills experience, that has been serving up the great red treat for over 50 years.

6. The Lobster Shack at Two Lights

Taking its name from the twin lighthouses across the road, the Lobster Shack at Two Lights sits atop a bluff, looking out at Casco Bay. Dress warmly if you visit, as the wind across the bluff can be fierce, but the views are as wonderful as the lobster! If you walk out the rocks below the lobster shack, on a clear day you can see Portland Head Lighthouse in the distance.


Days Crabmeat and Lobster

7. Days Crabmeat and Lobster, Yarmouth

 Just along the side of US-1 as you pass from Yarmouth to Freeport is Days Crabmeat and Lobster. Not only can you eat at the takeout area, but this is one of the best places for lobster to take home (packed to travel) in the area.

8. Cindy’s Clams, Freeport

Barely known outside of Freeport, Cindy’s Clams has been recognized as having the very best clams (not to mention some pretty fair lobster). It’s funky atmosphere and silly signs just makes dining at Cindy’s more of a pleasure!

9. Harraseeket Lunch & Lobster, Freeport

Harraseeket Lunch & Lobster

Freeport’s harbor is about a mile or so from its well-known shops, but most visitors find their way there to enjoy fresh, local, lobster, right off the boats. Eat outdoors or inside, you’ll have a nice view of the harbor, and across to the lovely peninsula where Wolfe Neck State Park is located. Arrive early in the summer, as lines can be quite long.

10. Linda Bean’s Perfect Maine Lobster Roll, various locations

Linda Bean is L.L. Bean’s granddaughter, and has certainly inherited good business sense. Linda’s lobster roll shops are in Freeport, Portland, Rockport, Port Clyde, not to mention Hull, Massachusetts and Delray Beach, Florida. She also has Linda Bean’s Maine Kitchen and Topside Tavern in Freeport.

Estes Lobster House

11. Estes Lobster House, Harpswell

Estes Lobster House has been serving lobster since 1947, but since it is at the tip of Harpswell Neck, it can be a bit off the beaten track for visitors. For example, the directions include “follow Route 123 until you come to the sea.” Not surprisingly, you can also arrive at Estes Lobster House by boat, as the dock is just feet away. Harpswell is a classic lobstering town, so you’re assured of the best and freshest seafood you can find!

Five Islands Lobster Co.

12. Five Islands Lobster Co., Five Islands

Five Islands is located near the tip of Georgetown Island, along the Maine coast. The drive is beautiful, as you pass harbors and villages, then the entrance to lovely Reid State Park with its rocks and beaches. Five Islands is a hidden jewel, with lovely islands just offshore, and a lighthouse across the water. Lobster is served at picnic tables on the dock, so you can watch your supper being brought in by the lobster boats.

13. Lighthouse Lobster Shack, Wiscasset

Located at the relatively new Maine Heritage Village, the Lighthouse Lobster Shack is right along US-1. The lobster shack gets fresh lobster daily, so their seafood is always fresh.

Red’s Eats

14. Red’s Eats, Wiscasset

Reds Eats in Wiscasset, like the Clam Shack in Kennebunkport, is a perennial nominee for the best lobster shack in the state. They do not have a website, but they finally did get a Facebook page (the link above is to their Facebook page). In the summer the lines for this pound-size lobster roll can stretch around the corner and down the walk near the river, as visitors wait to sample the delicious fare.

15. Trevette Country Store, Barter’s Island

The Trevette Country Store doesn’t have a website, but it certainly has its loyal customers! Just over the Barter’s Island bridge, the store serves up lobster rolls said to be fabulous and inexpensive.

The Lobster Dock

16. The Lobster Dock, Boothbay Harbor

More a restaurant than a lobster shack, the Lobster Dock has plenty of indoor and outdoor seating, and magnificent views of Boothbay Harbor. Watch your lobster slip into a big pot with an ear of corn, and wait for the succulent delight as your meal is served at a table on the deck overlooking the water. Mmmmmm!

17. Shaws Fish and Lobster Wharf, New Harbor

Located near Pemaquid Point Lighthouse, in New Harbor, Shaws is a perennial member of the Travel + Leisure “Top Ten” list. It is situated overlooking the beautiful harbor, where you can also take puffin watching or whale watching tours in this tiny coastal hideaway town.

Waterman’s Beach Lobster

18. Waterman’s Beach Lobster, South Thomaston

Down the hill from the lovely town of Thomaston, Waterman’s Beach Road leads to the water, and to Waterman’s Beach Lobster. Over two decades of serving lobster has made this a local favorite, and, for those visitors who can find their way to it, a favorite of visitors as well.

19. Bagaduce Lunch, Brooksville

Other than its mention in Travel + Leisure, and lots of favorable online reviews, Bagaduce Lunch is another “best kept secret.” With no website we can find, there are still loyal fans who post glowing reviews of the tiny lobster shack in the gorgeous Blue Hill area.

Thurston’s Lobster Pound

20. Thurston’s Lobster Pound, Bass Harbor

Not far from Bar Harbor, but, once again, out of the mainstream, Thurston’s is at Bass Harbor, not far from Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse. Exploring this area is a real treat, and the beauty of the coast, the offshore islands, and the lighthouse can easily be rewarded with a treat of lobster at Thurstons.

No doubt there are others (certainly we haven’t hit them all – yet!). Feel free to suggest your favorites in the comments!

Scott & Ruth
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast

A Day Trip to See Fall Foliage, Lighthouses and Lobster!

September 6, 2011 by Scott Gile

The latest in our Day Trip series (see Boothbay Harbor, the Kennebunks, Owls Head and to See Moose) is here, just in time to plan the perfect trip to see fall foliage in Maine, Lighthouses, and Lobster!

From your base at Brewster House Bed & Breakfast in Freeport Maine, this day trip will take as much time as you want to give it. There are lots of choices, turning off the main highways to see fall colors, lighthouses and visit lobster shacks. Fall foliage season usually starts near the end of September and continues through October. You can check the status of the foliage at the State of Maine foliage website, beginning September 14. Peak foliage generally starts in the far north and west of the state, then moves east and south. Besides the peak (which doesn’t last long), excellent foliage can usually be seen for quite some time on either side of the peak.

Since there is almost always a part of US-1 that is full of color during the fall foliage season, after your delicious breakfast at Brewster House, we suggest going north from Freeport along US-1, for about 45 minutes, to Damariscotta, where the fall foliage view of the town across the Sheepscot River is postcard-perfect. Exiting US-1 there, and heading out Maine Route 131, the peninsula is full of color, on the way to Pemaquid Point light house, one of the most spectacularly scenic locations along the coast.

Returning to Damariscotta, turn left just before US-1, and follow River Road through Newcastle and enjoy the foliage along the river, as you make your way to Maine Route 27, turning left toward Boothbay Harbor. Enjoy the lovely working harbor, and if it is time for a meal, try the Lobster Dock (they do close for the season some time between mid-October and the end of the month, so you may want to call ahead to be sure they’re open). Find time for an ice cream cone at Downeast Ice Cream (at the end of Wharf Street), before continuing on Route 27 toward Newagen, where you can see the seldom seen lighthouse known as “The Cuckolds” offshore.

Return on Maine Route 238 to Boothbay, where you’ll take Route 27 back to US-1, then head south to Woolwich. Just before crossing the river to Bath, take the exit for Reid State Park. You’ll see nice foliage on Georgetown Island, and can enjoy the views at Reid, or continue on the Five Islands, and the Five Islands Lobster Shack for a wonderful meal on the dock (where you can also watch the lobster boats unload their catch, if your timing is right).

If you’ve had enough driving, just return to US-1 and head back to Freeport for a bit of R&R and retail therapy. If not, take one more peninsula, by exiting US-1 at Cooks Corner, and take Maine Route 24 to Orrs Island and Bailey Island. The road winds through wooded areas and seaside, with plenty of fall colors, across the Cribstone Bridge connecting Orrs to Bailey Islands, and taking you past Cooks Lobster House, well-known for its fine lobster dinners.

You can go the the end of the road (called, appropriately enough, Land’s End) on Bailey’s Island, where you can see in the distance the lighthouse called Halfway Rock Lighthouse. The lighthouse almost appears to be floating on the water, as the rock it sits on is covered at high tide.

Returning on Route 24, watch for Mountain Road and turn left, cutting over to Harpswell and Route 123, to provide a different route back to US-1 via Brunswick, then back to Freeport.

Where Do All the Guests Go After Breakfast?

July 21, 2011 by Scott Gile

Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine
Brewster House Bed & Breakfast, Freeport, Maine

Most people who visit our Freeport Maine Bed & Breakfast arrive planning to spend a bit of time shopping at the Freeport outlets and shops, or sightseeing along the Maine coast. However, as happens a few times each year, the other morning found a couple at breakfast who had no idea there was shopping in Freeport, had never heard of L.L. Bean, and didn’t know where all the other guests were going after breakfast!

Where are all the guests going?

Shopping

About 2 out of every 5 guests walking from Brewster House to the Freeport shops and outlets, which begin just about a block from our door. FreeportUSA says there are over 200 shops and restaurants in Freeport, but that number belies the charm of the historic buildings along Main Street.

In addition to L.L. Bean’s campus, which includes four of its stores (all four of these are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week), most of the shops and restaurants are located in historic buildings, dating to the late 1800’s. Even the McDonalds in Freeport is in a house that dates back before 1870. In the midst of all this is Freeport Village Station, which is a modern collection of shops and eateries, built to blend in with the historic buildings around it, and which included the L.L. Bean Outlet, which is the only L.L. Bean store that closes.

Sightseeing

Most of the rest of our guests leave quickly after breakfast to cover as much ground as possible, as they have planned sightseeing trips for the day that will take them to as many as eight lighthouses, at least three beaches, hiking in one of at least five state parks, or even all the way to Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park (now that is really a full day of sightseeing!). Our lighthouse map can help you find your way to the Maine lighthouses.

Lobster

Red’s Eats, Wiscasset

Some of our guests just can’t get enough lobster while they’re in Maine (imagine that)!

In addition to Freeport’s own lobster shack on the South Freeport dock, Harraseeket Lunch & Lobster, they will drive south to Kennebunkport to try the Clam Shack (reknowned for its lobster rolls), or north to Wiscasset to sample the rolls at Red’s Eats. Still others will visit Five Islands Lobster Shack, or head for Pemaquid Point Lighthouse, followed by a side trip to Shaws Lobster in New Harbor, or Cape Elizabeth Lighthouse and Two Lights Lobster Shack. Of course, we have a map of Maine lobster shacks, too.

Whatever your interest (and tastes), nearly all our first-time visitors (and more than a few of our returning guests) find that there is more to do than they can possibly fit into just a couple of days. They leave anxious to plan their next visit to Freeport, Maine!

Lobster Lover’s Guide to Freeport Maine Restaurants

July 12, 2011 by Scott Gile

Two years ago we created our Map of Maine Lobster Shacks in response to Travel + Leisure’s list of the 10 Best Lobster Shacks in Maine. We thought they had overlooked some good ones, so we added them. Our readers agreed, and suggested some more, which we have also added.

More recently, some of our guests at our Freeport Maine Bed & Breakfast have categorically stated that they were here to eat lobster. Lobster for every meal (except breakfast, as they eat that at Brewster House, of course). Lobster in every way they can find it. So, where to go?

Freeport Restaurants

Freeport’s Economic Development office lists 33 restaurants. That is certainly more than we can cover in one blog post, but the truth is, nearly all of them serve lobster in one form or another, whether a traditional whole lobster dinner, a lobster roll, lobster stew, lobster bisque, or something more exotic.

Lobster rolls can be found at McDonalds (yes, McDonalds), as well as several other restaurants, including the Corsican Restaurant, the Broad Arrow Tavern, the Freeport Chowder House, and the Lobster Cooker,

The Freeport Chowder House also has lobster cakes (like crab cakes, but different).

Many places, including Harraseeket Lunch & Lobster, at the South Freeport wharf, have a full lobster dinner, featuring the traditional steamed whole lobster. Jameson Tavern offers this, and several fairly traditional lobster formulas, like lobster tail, steak & lobster, lobster with chowder and steamed clams, and a lazy man’s lobster (all the work of shelling it is done for you). Lobster Alfredo can be found at Petrillo’s.

One of Freeport’s newest restaurants is Linda Bean’s Maine Kitchen and Topside Tavern. Linda is the granddaughter of legendary L.L. Bean. Her restaurant offers a variety of Maine seafood, including several lobster dishes.

You’ll find lobster salad at the Corsican Restaurant and the Muddy Rudder (which also offers lobster crepes, and whole lobster).

For lobster stew try the Broad Arrow Tavern at the Harraseeket Inn, or the Corsican Restaurant. Lobster Cooker also has a lobster chowder and a lobster bisque.

Lobster pizza is available at Antonias Pizzeria, the Freeport Chowder House, and the Corsican Restaurant.

The Maine Dining Room at the Harraseeket Inn features several lobster dishes this summer, including Lobster Spring Roll, Lobster Crepe, Lobster Stew, Lobster and Spinach Fetuccini, and Steamed Lobster.

But perhaps the most variety, all with their usual outstanding quality and flavorful sauces, is Azure Cafe (home to the 2010 Maine Lobster Chef of the Year), who has lobster salad, a lobster version of their Seafood Risotto and also their Sicilian Style Cioppino, a full steamed lobster dinner (they guarantee the best price in town), a lobster Fetuccini Alfredo, and a Lobster Scampi.

Nearby

Of course, if you still need more variety, the many and varied restaurants of Portland are only a short drive away, and just beyond is Kennebunkport, Wells, and Kittery, while to the north are several great lobster shacks, such as Shaws in New Harbor, Five Islands Lobster Shack on Georgetown Island, and many, many more!

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